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Cells coexpressing both myeloid and endothelial markers are detectable in the spleen and bone marrow of patients with primary myelofibrosis

  • Rita Campanelli
    Correspondence
    Offprint requests to: Rita Campanelli, Center for the Study of Myelofibrosis, General Medicine 2—Center for systemic amyloidosis and high-complexity diseases, IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo Foundation, viale Golgi 19, 27100 Pavia, Italy
    Affiliations
    Center for the Study of Myelofibrosis, General Medicine 2—Center for systemic amyloidosis and high-complexity diseases, IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo Foundation, Pavia, Italy
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  • Carlotta Abbà
    Affiliations
    Center for the Study of Myelofibrosis, General Medicine 2—Center for systemic amyloidosis and high-complexity diseases, IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo Foundation, Pavia, Italy
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  • Adriana Carolei
    Affiliations
    Center for the Study of Myelofibrosis, General Medicine 2—Center for systemic amyloidosis and high-complexity diseases, IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo Foundation, Pavia, Italy
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  • Paolo Catarsi
    Affiliations
    Center for the Study of Myelofibrosis, General Medicine 2—Center for systemic amyloidosis and high-complexity diseases, IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo Foundation, Pavia, Italy
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  • Giovanni Barosi
    Affiliations
    Center for the Study of Myelofibrosis, General Medicine 2—Center for systemic amyloidosis and high-complexity diseases, IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo Foundation, Pavia, Italy
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  • Margherita Massa
    Affiliations
    General Medicine 2—Center for systemic amyloidosis and high-complexity diseases, IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo Foundation, Pavia, Italy
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  • Vittorio Rosti
    Affiliations
    Center for the Study of Myelofibrosis, General Medicine 2—Center for systemic amyloidosis and high-complexity diseases, IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo Foundation, Pavia, Italy
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Published:October 13, 2022DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.exphem.2022.10.002

      Highlights

      • Rare CD34+CD33+CD144+cells were identified in the BM and spleen of patients with PMF.
      • In PMF spleen tissues, few CD34+CD33+CD144+ cells were found within the vessel wall.
      • These biphenotypic cells could explain the origin of the mutated endothelium in PMF.
      Different bodies of evidence support the existence of a common origin of hematopoietic and endothelial lineages; moreover, recent studies have indicated the presence of a hemogenic endothelium and a common hemato-endothelial precursor both in the embryo and in the cord blood. Conversely, to our knowledge, there is no evidence of such bipotential cells in human postnatal tissues or blood. In this study, we investigated the presence and phenotype of “transitional” cells in different tissues of patients with primary myelofibrosis (PMF). Using confocal microscopy and flow cytometry, we identified a rare cell population in the bone marrow and spleen of patients with PMF, which coexpresses the endothelial marker CD144 (vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin), the pan-hematopoietic marker CD45, the early myeloid marker CD33, and CD34, a common endothelial and hematopoietic antigen.
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